Frequently Asked Questions

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Why do you need my medical insurance?

Doctors of Optometry and Ophthalmology are specialist physicians as they only treat eye and ocular issues. Most medical carriers will accept eye exams that are medical in nature, as where most vision riders will not. Unless there is knowledge of a preexisting condition, it is not possible to determine whether your exam will be billed through your routine vision plan or your medical insurance. Because of this, we require all medical insurances to be given and verified prior to your appointment, and medical co-payments rendered at the time of service based upon diagnosis.

Why do some people have less than 20/20?

The ability to see objects clearly is affected by many factors. Eye conditions like nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, or eye diseases influence visual acuity. Most people with vision slightly below 20/20 function very well, whereas some people who have better than 20/20 vision feel that their vision is not satisfactory. Everybody’s visual expectations are different and satisfactory vision is far more complex than just being able to see 20/20.

Is 25/25 vision better than 20/20?

No. 25/25 means normal sharpness of vision, or visual acuity, at 25 feet just as 20/20 indicates normal vision at 20 feet.

What is 20/20 Vision?

You may be pleased to hear that you have 20/20 vision and think you have perfect vision. But do you? Not necessarily. 20/20 only indicates how sharp or clear your vision is at a distance. Overall vision also includes peripheral awareness or side vision, eye coordination, depth perception, focusing ability and color vision. 20/20 describes normal visual clarity or sharpness measured at a distance of 20 feet from an object. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. If you have 20/100 vision, it means that you must be as close as 20 feet to see what a person with normal vision can see at 100 feet.

If my vision is less than optimum, what can I do?

A comprehensive eye examination will identify causes that may affect your ability to see well. We may be able to prescribe glasses, contact lenses or a vision therapy program that will help improve your vision. If the reduced vision is due to an eye disease, the use of ocular medication or other treatment may be needed. If necessary, referral will be undertaken if an eye disease is found which warrants further investigation.

Why do my eyes have to be dilated?

It is highly recommended to have the pupils dilated at the comprehensive eye exam. Dilation allows for the evaluation and detection of diseases (such as diabetes, hypertension, ocular melanomas, etc) on the retina that cannot be seen when pupils are in their normal state. Eye drops that enlarge the pupils are placed in the eyes. The most common side effects to these drops are an increased sensitivity to light and blurry near vision for about 4 to 6 hours. Therefore, it may be difficult to read or drive during this time. If you chose that you wish to not be dilated, our offices offer Optomap® screenings which take a comprehensive photo of the back of the eye. The Optomap® is not covered under any insurance when used as a screening substitution to the dilating process; therefore, a small fee is charged for this service and collected at the time the service is rendered.

If I already wear contacts, why do I have to be re-fit every year?

In February 2004, government passed a law called the “Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act” which states that all prescriptions for contact lenses need to be re-evaluated to ensure proper fit of the lens and health of the cornea, the front clear part of the eye. The fitting is a separate and distinct exam from a comprehensive exam, though both may be conducted at the same visit at the discretion of the optometrist. There is a separate fee for this exam which will be collected at the time of your visit.

Why do I need an exam and a fitting if I’m only getting colored contacts?

Any contact lens, whether it is being used as a vision aid or cosmetically, is a medical device and a foreign body in the eye. Having a full exam and fitting allows the doctor to ensure the health of the eye and determine whether successful contact lens wear can be achieved. A fitting allows the prescriber to determine the proper sizing for your eye and will also allow time for you to be taught the proper instillation and removal process, if necessary.

Should I wear my contacts to my appointment?

If you are going to be re-evaluated for contacts and you have the boxes and/or prescription of your lenses, you may wear them to your appointment. Please make sure that they have been on for at least an hour before hand. If you have run out of lenses, bringing the boxes/prescription with you will allow us to see what you’ve been wearing so we can keep you in what is most comfortable and reduce the amount of follow up appointments necessary.

Is it necessary for me to gather prior records before my appointment?

It is not necessary to have your prior eye health records in order to be seen however, it is helpful if you do. You may contact the facility in which you received your last exam/s for their record release policies.

If my frame breaks, can my lenses go into any frame?

No. Your lenses are specially cut for the frame that you chose. If your frame breaks and we do not have the exact frame, or you wish to change the style, new lenses would need to be purchased and cut for that frame.

Can the scratches in my lenses be “buffed” out?

The thickness of an eyeglass lens is what determines the strength of power in that lens. If your lenses get scratched, “buffing” the scratches out would alter the thickness and therefore change the prescription of the lens. We recommend when purchasing your new glasses that you choose a Crizal® brand lens. Not only does the anti-reflective increase your clarity up to 16% by decreasing surface glare but they also offer an unlimited 2 year scratch warranty.

Will Visual Perceptions fill a prescription I received from another doctor?

Yes, as long as the prescription has not expired, we can fill outside glasses or contact lens prescriptions. If your prescription has expired, we will be happy to schedule you for a new examination at a convenient time for you.


Visual Perceptions links you to a wealth of online vision resources. Each article opens in a new window.

All About Vision
American Optometric Association
Connecticut Association of Optometrists

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